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Infection Prevention and Control Practices Implemented for Congenital Measles in an Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2020

Lisa Saiman
Affiliation:
Columbia University
Erin Hanft
Affiliation:
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
Sandhya Brachio
Affiliation:
Columbia University Irving Medical Center
Maria Messina
Affiliation:
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
Philip Zachariah
Affiliation:
Columbia University Medical Center
Dena Goffman
Affiliation:
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Irving Medical Center
Janett Pike
Affiliation:
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
Lesley Covington
Affiliation:
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
Krishika A Graham
Affiliation:
NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Nina Ahmad
Affiliation:
New York State Department of Health
Elizabeth Rausch-Phung
Affiliation:
New York State Department of Health
Patrick Bryant
Affiliation:
Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health
Anagha Khandekar
Affiliation:
Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health
Karen Kulas
Affiliation:
Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health
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Abstract

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Background: Measles can cause miscarriages and preterm birth in nonimmune pregnant women. During the 2018–2019 measles outbreak in New York, a woman with measles delivered an extremely low birth weight preterm infant at our Women and Children’s Hospital. We describe our measles preparedness strategies and infection prevention and control (IPC) management relevant to congenital measles. Methods: Because of the measles outbreak, in Q4 2018, IPC verified measles immunity in all obstetric and pediatric staff, per state regulations, and recommended determining the measles immune status of all pregnant women. To prevent measles exposure, visitor restrictions for the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) were implemented (May 2019); only 3 visitors were permitted for each infant, including parents. All visitors had to provide written documentation of immunity to measles, regardless of epidemiologic risk factors or receive an MMR vaccine prior to visiting. New York state and New York City health departments performed measles diagnostic testing for maternal and infant specimens. Results: Our hospital was informed of the imminent transfer of a woman in preterm labor with suspected measles. To avoid any exposure, the mother was masked in the ambulance bay and taken by commandeered elevator to the obstetrical operating room suite, which was cleared of other patients. She delivered by C-section and was transferred to an airborne infection isolation (AII) room. The 25-week-gestation infant was transported by isolette to the NICU and was placed on AII. Testing confirmed measles in the mother (measles PCR- and IgM-positive) and congenital measles in the infant (Table 1). The mother was allowed to visit the NICU when her respiratory symptoms and rash resolved, as confirmed by her provider, ~10 days after discharge. The infant never developed a rash, pneumonia, or neurologic findings. AII was discontinued on day of life 61 in consultation with the health departments. The infant was discharged at ~36 weeks gestation. No secondary cases of measles occurred among patients, visitors, or staff. Conclusions: We safely cared for an extremely preterm infant with congenital measles. Laboratory testing suggested prolonged presence of measles virus, but it is unknown how long an infant in the NICU should remain on AII. The current Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists case definition for measles requires the presence of rash. This case provides support to revise this case definition if laboratory findings are consistent with congenital measles.

Funding: None

Disclosures: None

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.
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