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Factors Influencing Field Testing of Alcohol-Based Hand Rubs

  • Raphaële Girard (a1), Emmanuelle Carre (a2), Valérie Mermet (a2), Crespin C. Adjide (a3), Sylviane Blaise (a4), Monique Dagain (a5), Christine Debeuret (a6), Stéphane Delande (a7), Valérie Dubois (a8), Pascal Fascia (a9), Caroline Hadjadj (a10), Marianne Honnart (a5), Christelle Labrande (a6), Agnès Lasheras Bauduin (a11), Adeline Martin (a12), Françoise Petiteau Moreau (a10), Nicole Roattino (a13), Estelle Rougeot (a14), Jacqueline Shum Cheong Sing (a15), Martine Urban (a16) and Marie Laure Valdeyron (a1)...

Abstract

BACKGROUND

According to the World Health Organization guidelines, field tests, in the context of a bid for the supply of alcohol-based hand rubs, should take into account climatic region, test period, products already in use, and type of use (hygienic or surgical) when assessing tolerance. This laborious method is often contested.

OBJECTIVE

To conduct a post hoc analysis of the data of a large bid, including 5 factors, to validate the relevance of their inclusion.

METHODS

For the purposes of the bid, products were compared in terms of the 4 World Health Organization tolerance criteria (appearance, intactness, moisture content, sensation) during product testing and were separated into groups on the basis of the studied factors. The post hoc analysis method included (1) comparison of the mean before-and-after difference based on the self-evaluation of the skin with the 4 World Health Organization tolerance criteria, between climatic regions, periods, products in use, test product, and the type of use; (2) generalized linear models, taking into account all studied factors.

RESULTS

The analysis included data for 1,925 pairs of professionals. The means of the differences observed were independently and significantly associated with the test period (P<.001), the hygienic or surgical use (P=.010 to .041, not significant for appearance), the product already in use (significant for appearance P=.021), and the test product (P<.001). The association with climatic region was found to be significant only in the nonadjusted analysis.

CONCLUSION

The type of use, the test period, and the product in use should be taken into account when designing field tests of alcohol-based hand rubs.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014;00(0): 1–9

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address correspondence to Raphaële Girard, MD, Unité d’Hygiène et Epidémiologie, Bâtiment 3B, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, 69495 Pierre Bénite CEDEX France (raphaele.girard@chu-lyon.fr).

References

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Factors Influencing Field Testing of Alcohol-Based Hand Rubs

  • Raphaële Girard (a1), Emmanuelle Carre (a2), Valérie Mermet (a2), Crespin C. Adjide (a3), Sylviane Blaise (a4), Monique Dagain (a5), Christine Debeuret (a6), Stéphane Delande (a7), Valérie Dubois (a8), Pascal Fascia (a9), Caroline Hadjadj (a10), Marianne Honnart (a5), Christelle Labrande (a6), Agnès Lasheras Bauduin (a11), Adeline Martin (a12), Françoise Petiteau Moreau (a10), Nicole Roattino (a13), Estelle Rougeot (a14), Jacqueline Shum Cheong Sing (a15), Martine Urban (a16) and Marie Laure Valdeyron (a1)...

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