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Enterobacter Sepsis in Infants and Children Due to Contaminated Intravenous Fluids

  • Nikos S. Matsaniotis (a1), Vassiliki Ph. Syriopoulou (a1), Maria Ch. Theodoridou (a1), Konstantina G. Tzanetou (a1) and Glyceria I. Mostrou (a1)...

Abstract

Sixty-three cases of nosocomial sepsis occurring from April through October 1981, in a 500-bed pediatric hospital, were traced to bacterial contamination of intravenous fluid produced by a single manufacturer. Two species of uncommon blood stream pathogens, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter agglomerans contaminated the fluid. Infections with these organisms might have contributed to the death of four patients; two who were immunosuppressed, one who was asplenic and one premature infant. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations identified the site of contamination to be within the screw-caps of the bottles containing the intravenous fluid. Contamination occurred during insertion of the intravenous fluid administration set into the bottle. The “epidemic” terminated when the hospital discontinued the use of infusion fluids from that manufacturer. We conclude that intravenous fluids should be examined during outbreaks of nosocomial bacteremia due to unusual pathogens.

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Corresponding author

Athens University, “Aghia Sophia” Children's Hospital, Athens, 115, 27, Greece

References

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Enterobacter Sepsis in Infants and Children Due to Contaminated Intravenous Fluids

  • Nikos S. Matsaniotis (a1), Vassiliki Ph. Syriopoulou (a1), Maria Ch. Theodoridou (a1), Konstantina G. Tzanetou (a1) and Glyceria I. Mostrou (a1)...

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