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Ciprofloxacin and Clostridium difficile– Associated Diarrhea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Claudia Thomas
Affiliation:
Departments of Microbiology and Public Health, University of Western Australia
Clayton L. Golledge
Affiliation:
Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Western Australian Centre for Pathology and Medical Research
Thomas V. Riley
Affiliation:
Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Western Australian Centre for Pathology and Medical Research Department of Microbiology, University of Western Australiaand Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Western Australian Centre for Pathology and Medical Research Nedlands, Perth, Western Australia
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Abstract

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Type
Letters to the Editor
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2002

References

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