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Building Better Programs to Prevent Transmission of Blood-Borne Pathogens to Healthcare Personnel: Progress in the Workplace, But Still No End in Sight

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

David A. Pegues
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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Abstract

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Type
Editorial
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2003

References

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Building Better Programs to Prevent Transmission of Blood-Borne Pathogens to Healthcare Personnel: Progress in the Workplace, But Still No End in Sight
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