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Are reusable blood collection tube holders the culprit for nosocomial hepatitis C virus transmission?

  • Dominic N. C. Tsang (a1), Margaret Ip (a2), Paul K. S. Chan (a2), Patricia Tai Yin Ching (a3), Hung Suet Lam (a4) and Wing Hong Seto (a3)...
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Abstract

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Dominic N. C. Tsang, Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, 30 Gascoigne Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. E-mail: nctsang@ha.org.hk

Footnotes

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Cite this article: Tsang DNC, et al. (2019). Are reusable blood collection tube holders the culprit for nosocomial hepatitis C virus transmission? Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology 2019, 40, 250–251. doi: 10.1017/ice.2018.302

Footnotes

References

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1. Cheng, VCC, Wong, SC, Wong, SCY, et al. Nosocomial transmission of hepatitis C virus in a liver transplant center in Hong Kong: implication of reusable blood collection tube holder as the vehicle for transmission. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:11701177.
2. Dolan, SA, Arias, KM, Felizardo, G, et al. APIC position paper: safe injection, infusion, and medication vial practices in health care. Am J Infect Control 2016;44:750757.
3. Perz, JF, Thompson, ND, Schaefer, MK, Patel, PR US outbreak investigations highlight the need for safe injection practices and basic infection control. Clin Liver Dis 2010;14:137151.
4. Johannessen, I, Danial, J, Smith, DB, et al. Molecular and epidemiological evidence of patient-to-patient hepatitis C virus transmission in a Scottish emergency department. J Hosp Infect 2018;98:412418.
5. TÜV Osterreich (TÜV Austria). Export report MT0110/00/ME concerning safety issues on VACCUETTE blood collection system of Greiner Labortechnik GmbH. Vienna. 2000.

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