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Web-Based Training Improves Knowledge about Central Line Bloodstream Infections

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Angela Comer
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Outcomes, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland
Anthony D. Harris
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Outcomes, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland
Michelle Shardell
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Outcomes, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland
Barbara Braun
Affiliation:
Department of Health Services Research, Division of Healthcare Quality Evaluation, The Joint Commission, Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois
Beverly M. Belton
Affiliation:
Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response, Yale New Haven Health System, New Haven, Connecticut
Susan D. Wolfsthal
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Louise-Marie Dembry
Affiliation:
Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response, Yale New Haven Health System, New Haven, Connecticut
Jesse T. Jacob
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
Connie Price
Affiliation:
Infection Prevention/Hospital Epidemiology and Division of Infectious Diseases, Denver Health and Hospital, Denver, Colorado
Carol Sulis
Affiliation:
Boston Medical Center, and Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
Eugene S. Chu
Affiliation:
Hospital Medicine Service, Boulder Community Hospital, Boulder, Colorado School of Medicine, University of Colo6rado, Denver, Colorado
Yan Xiao*
Affiliation:
Office of Patient Safety, Baylor Health Care System, Dallas, Texas
*Corresponding
Office of Patient Safety, Baylor Health Care System, 8080 N. Central Expressway, Dallas, TX 75206 (yan.xiao@baylorhealth.edu)

Abstract

A Web-based training course with embedded video clips for reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) was evaluated and shown to improve clinician knowledge and retention of knowledge over time. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate Web-based CLABSI training as a stand-alone intervention.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2011

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Footnotes

a

ASPIRRE Subgroup: Cathy Korn, RN, MPH, CIC; Rachel Kimmel, RN; Georgia Jackson, RN, BSN, MPH; Amy Irwin, DNP, MS, RN; Valerie Hart, RN, PhD, MSN.

References

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Web-Based Training Improves Knowledge about Central Line Bloodstream Infections
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