Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-j4fss Total loading time: 0.31 Render date: 2022-10-02T17:26:03.209Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Visitor restriction policies and practices in children’s hospitals in North America: results of an Emerging Infections Network Survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2018

Alice L. Pong*
Affiliation:
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, California Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, California
Susan E. Beekmann
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Mekleet M. Faltamo
Affiliation:
Emory University College of Arts and Sciences, Atlanta, Georgia
Philip M. Polgreen
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa Department of Epidemiology University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa
Andi L. Shane
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia
*
Author for correspondence: Alice Pong, MD, 3020 Children’s Way, MC 5041, San Diego, CA 92123. E-mail: apong@rchsd.org

Abstract

Objective

To delineate the timing of, indications for, and assessment of visitor restriction policies and practices (VRPP) in pediatric facilities.

Design

An electronic survey to characterize VRPP in pediatric healthcare facilities.

Methods

The Infectious Diseases Society of America Emerging Infections Network surveyed 334 pediatric infectious disease consultants via an electronic link. Descriptive analyses were performed.

Results

A total of 170 eligible respondents completed a survey between 12 July and August 15, 2016, for a 51% response rate. Of the 104 respondents (61%) familiar with their VRPP, 92 (88%) had VRPP in all inpatient units. The respondents reported age-based VRPP (74%) symptom-based VRPP (97%), and outbreak-specific VRPP (75%). Symptom-based VRPP were reported to be seasonal by 24% of respondents and to be implemented year-round according to 70% of respondents. According to the respondents, communication of VRPP to families occurred at admission (87%) and through signage in care areas (64%), while communication of VRPP to staff occurred by email (77%), by meetings (55%), and by signage in staff-only areas (49%). Respondents reported that enforcement of VRPP was the responsibility of nursing (80%), registration clerks (58%), unit clerks (53%), the infection prevention team (31%), or clinicians 16 (16%). They also reported that the effectiveness of VRPP was assessed through active surveillance of hospital acquired respiratory infections (62%), through active surveillance of healthcare worker exposures (28%) and through patient/family satisfaction assessments (29%).

Conclusion

Visitor restriction policies and practices vary in scope, implementation, enforcement, and physician awareness in pediatric facilities. A prospective multisite evaluation of outcomes would facilitate the adoption of uniform guidance.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© 2018 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Hansen, S, Stamm-Balderjahn, S, Zuschneid, I, et al. Closure of medical departments during nosocomial outbreaks: data from a systematic analysis of the literature. J Hosp Infect 2007;65:348353.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2. Halasa, NB, Williams, JV, Wilson, GJ, Walsh, WF, Schaffner, W, Wright, PF. Medical and economic impact of a respiratory syncytial virus outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2005;24:10401044.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Ehlken, B, Ihorst, G, Lippert, B, et al. Economic impact of community-acquired and nosocomial lower respiratory tract infections in young children in Germany. Eur J Pediatr 2005;164:607615.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4. Macartney, KK, Gorelick, MH, Manning, ML, Hodinka, RL, Bell, LM. Nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infections: the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of infection control. Pediatrics 2000;106:520526.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5. Dare, RK, Talbot, TR. Health care-acquired viral respiratory diseases. Infect Dis Clin North Am 2016;30:10531070.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6. Hall, CB. Nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infections: the “Cold War” has not ended. Clin Infect Dis 2000;31:590596.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Kuo, DZ, Houtrow, AJ, Arango, P, Kuhlthau, KA, Simmons, JM, Neff, JM. Family-centered care: current applications and future directions in pediatric health care. Matern Child Health J 2012;16:297305.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8. Rozdilsky, JR. Enhancing sibling presence in pediatric ICU. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2005;17:451461, xii.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9. Shuler, SN, Reich, CA. Sibling visitation in pediatric hospitals: policies, opinions, and issues. Child Health Care 1983;11:5460.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10. Garcia, R, Raad, I, Abi-Said, D, et al. Nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infections: prevention and control in bone marrow transplant patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1997;18:412416.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11. Snydman, DR, Greer, C, Meissner, HC, McIntosh, K. Prevention of nosocomial transmission of respiratory syncytial virus in a newborn nursery. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1988;9:105108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Siegel, JD, Rhinehart, E, Jackson, M, Chiarello, L. 2007 Guideline for isolation precautions: preventing transmission of infectious agents in health care settings. Am J Infect Control 2007;35:S65S164.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13. Pillai, SK, Beekmann, SE, Santibanez, S, Polgreen, PM. The Infectious Diseases Society of America emerging infections network: bridging the gap between clinical infectious diseases and public health. Clin Infect Dis 2014;58:991996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Liu, V, Read, JL, Scruth, E, Cheng, E. Visitation policies and practices in US ICUs. Crit Care 2013;17:R71.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15. Washam, M, Woltmann, J, Ankrum, A, Connelly, B. Association of visitation policy and health care-acquired respiratory viral infections in hospitalized children. Am J Infect Control 2018;46:353355.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Visitor restriction policies and practices in children’s hospitals in North America: results of an Emerging Infections Network Survey
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Visitor restriction policies and practices in children’s hospitals in North America: results of an Emerging Infections Network Survey
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Visitor restriction policies and practices in children’s hospitals in North America: results of an Emerging Infections Network Survey
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *