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Transmission of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) from patients less than 3 years of age in a pediatric oncology setting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2020

Elizabeth Robilotti*
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York Infection Control, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
Weihua Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
N. Esther Babady
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York Clinical Microbiology Service, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
Donald Chen
Affiliation:
Infection Prevention and Control Department, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA
Mini Kamboj
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York Infection Control, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
*
Author for correspondence: Elizabeth Robilotti, Email: robilotti@gmail.com

Abstract

Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is prevalent in pediatric oncology patients, but the transmission risk to peers is unknown. In 224 children with CDI, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified only 7 alleged transmission events (18%) originating from children <3 years old. None of these events were corroborated by WGS.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

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