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Theoretical Risk for Occupational Blood-Borne Infections in Forensic Pathologists

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Kurt B. Nolte
Affiliation:
Medical Examiner/Coroner Information Sharing Program, Division of Public Health Surveillance and Informatics, Epidemiology Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia Office of the Medical Investigator, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Steven S. Yoon
Affiliation:
Medical Examiner/Coroner Information Sharing Program, Division of Public Health Surveillance and Informatics, Epidemiology Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

Abstract

Using a cumulative probability analysis and published data, we calculated the theoretical career risk of occupational HIV (2.4%) and HCV (39%; possible range, 13% to 94%) infections for forensic pathologists. Serologic studies of these physicians are needed to clarify occupational exposure and infection risks. Autopsy personnel should wear cut-resistant undergloves to decrease percutaneous injuries.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2003

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References

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