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Study of Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt–Associated Infections in the First Year Following Placement, by the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Joanne M. Langley
Affiliation:
Departments of Pediatrics and Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia Canadian Center for Vaccinology, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Denise Gravel
Affiliation:
Center for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario
Dorothy Moore
Affiliation:
Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Anne Matlow
Affiliation:
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario
Joanne Embree
Affiliation:
Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Donna MacKinnon-Cameron
Affiliation:
Canadian Center for Vaccinology, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia
John Conly
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

In a national surveillance system study, the infection rate following cerebrospinal fluid shunt surgery was 4.1% (95% confidence interval, 3.36%-4.92%). Cases of infection were more common in children than in adults (4.85% vs 3.24%; P = .04) and occurred sooner after surgery in children than in adults. A wide variation in compliance with antimicrobial prophylaxis was observed between 21 participating medical centers.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2009

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References

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Study of Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt–Associated Infections in the First Year Following Placement, by the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program
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