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Reactive Infection Control Strategy for Control of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase (NDM)-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Analyzed Using Whole-Genome Sequencing: Hits and Misses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2016

Kalisvar Marimuthu*
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
Oon Tek Ng
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
Wei Xin Khong
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
Eryu Xia
Affiliation:
NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
Yik-Ying Teo
Affiliation:
NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Department of Statistics and Applied Probability, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
Rick Twee-Hee Ong
Affiliation:
Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
David Chien Lye
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
Angela Liping Chow
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
Prabha Krishnan
Affiliation:
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore.
Brenda Sze Ang
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
*
Address correspondence to Kalisvar Marimuthu, Department of Infectious Diseases, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, 308433 Singapore (Kalisvar_marimuthu@ttsh.com.sg).

Abstract

Genetically distinct isolates of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM)–producing Enterobacteriaceae were identified from the clinical cultures of 6 patients. Screening of shared-ward contacts identified 2 additional NDM-positive patients. Phylogenetic analysis proved that 1 contact was a direct transmission while the other was unrelated to the index, suggesting hidden routes of transmission.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:987–990

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2016 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION. The Third International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC) in Geneva, Switzerland on June 13, 2015.

a

Authors with equal contribution.

References

REFERENCES

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