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A randomized trial of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light versus sodium hypochlorite delivered by an electrostatic sprayer for adjunctive decontamination of hospital rooms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 June 2022

Matthew G. Carlisle
Affiliation:
Research Service, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio
William A. Rutala
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Jennifer L. Cadnum
Affiliation:
Research Service, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Brigid M. Wilson
Affiliation:
Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio
Abhishek Deshpande
Affiliation:
Center for Value-Based Care Research, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
Curtis J. Donskey*
Affiliation:
Center for Value-Based Care Research, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
*
Author for correspondence: Curtis J. Donskey, MD, E-mail: Curtis.Donskey@va.gov

Abstract

In a randomized trial, adjunctive ultraviolet-C light treatment with a room decontamination device and sodium hypochlorite delivered via an electrostatic sprayer were similarly effective in significantly reducing residual healthcare-associated pathogen contamination on floors and high-touch surfaces after manual cleaning and disinfection. Less time until the room was ready to be occupied by another patient was required for electrostatic spraying.

Type
Concise Communication
Creative Commons
This is a work of the US Government and is not subject to copyright protection within the United States. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
Copyright
© Department of Veterans Affairs, 2022

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References

Donskey, CJ. Decontamination devices in healthcare facilities: practical issues and emerging applications. Am J Infect Control 2019;47S:A23A28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Tanner, WD, Leecaster, MK, Zhang, Y, et al. Environmental contamination of contact precaution and non-contact precaution patient rooms in six acute-care facilities. Clin Infect Dis 2021;72 suppl 1:S8S16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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A randomized trial of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light versus sodium hypochlorite delivered by an electrostatic sprayer for adjunctive decontamination of hospital rooms
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