Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-g2shf Total loading time: 0.307 Render date: 2023-02-09T07:00:37.396Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Public Reporting of Hospital-Acquired Infections Is Not Associated with Improved Processes or Outcomes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Darren R. Linkin*
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Division of Infectious Diseases, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Neil O. Fishman
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Division of Infectious Diseases, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Judy A. Shea
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Division of General Internal Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Wei Yang
Affiliation:
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Mark S. Cary
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Ebbing Lautenbach
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Division of Infectious Diseases, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
*
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia VAMC, Department of Medicine, 3900 Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (dlinkin@gmail.com)

Abstract

Most US states have enacted or are considering legislation mandating hospitals to publicly report hospital-acquired infection (HAI) rates. We conducted a survey of infection control professionals and found that state-legislated public reporting of HAIs is not associated with perceived improvements in infection prevention program process measures or HAI rates.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.National Conference of State Legislatures. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other healthcare-associated infections, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=14084. Accessed March 20, 2013.Google Scholar
2.McKibben, L, Horan, T, Tokars, JI, et al.Guidance on public reporting of healthcare-associated infections: recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Am J Infect Control 2005;33(4):217226. doi:10.1016/j.ajic.2005.04.001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3.Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. SHEA research network. http://www.shea-online.org/Research/SHEAResearchNetwork.aspx. Accessed March 20, 2013.Google Scholar
4.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State-based HAI prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/HAI/state-based/index.html. Accessed March 20, 2013.Google Scholar
5. Committee to Reduce Infection Deaths. State legislation and initiatives on healthcare-associated infections, http://www.hospitalinfection.org/legislation.shtml. Updated October 2011. Accessed November 9, 2012.Google Scholar
6.Schneider, EC, Epstein, AM. Influence of cardiac-surgery performance reports on referral practices and access to care: a survey of cardiovascular specialists. N Engl J Med 1996;335(4):251256. doi:10.1056/NEJM199607253350406.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7.Edwards, JR, Peterson, KD, Mu, Y, et al.National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) report: data summary for 2006 through 2008, issued December 2009. Am J Infect Control 2009;37(10): 783805. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2009.10.001.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Burton, DC, Edwards, JR, Horan, TC, Jernigan, JA, Fridkin, SK. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus central line-associated bloodstream infections in US intensive care units, 1997-2007. JAMA 2009;301(7):727736. doi:10.1001/jama.2009.153.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9.Lin, MY, Hota, B, Khan, YM, et al.Quality of traditional surveillance for public reporting of nosocomial bloodstream infection rates. JAMA 2010;304(18):20352041. doi:10.1001/jama.2010.1637.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10.Sexton, DJ, Chen, LF, Anderson, DJ. Current definitions of central line-associated bloodstream infection: is the emperor wearing clothes? Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010;31(12):12861289. doi:10.1086/657583.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Public Reporting of Hospital-Acquired Infections Is Not Associated with Improved Processes or Outcomes
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Public Reporting of Hospital-Acquired Infections Is Not Associated with Improved Processes or Outcomes
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Public Reporting of Hospital-Acquired Infections Is Not Associated with Improved Processes or Outcomes
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *