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Pseudo-outbreak of Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium sp. Associated with Contamination of Heparin-Saline Solution Syringes Used During Bone Marrow Aspiration

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 October 2015


Clare Rock
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Bonnie C.K. Wong
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Kim Dionne
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Miriana Pehar
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Thomas S. Kickler
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Trish M. Perl
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Health System, Baltimore, Maryland.
Mark Romagnoli
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Tracy Ross
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Teresa Wakefield
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Polly Trexler
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Karen Carroll
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Lisa L. Maragakis
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

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Type
Research Briefs
Copyright
© 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: Preliminary findings of this outbreak investigation were presented in part in poster format at the SHEA 2011 annual scientific meeting April 1–4, 2011, in Dallas, Texas.


References

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6. Brown, MA, Greene, JN, Sandin, RL, Hiemenz, JW, Sinnott, JT. Methylobacterium bacteremia after infusion of contaminated autologous bone marrow. Clin Infect Dis 1996;23:11911192.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7. Flournoy, DJ, Petrone, RL, Voth, DW. A pseudo-outbreak of Methylobacterium mesophilica isolated from patients undergoing bronchoscopy. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 1992;11:240243.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8. Blossom, D, Noble-Wang, J, Su, J, et al. Multistate outbreak of Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections caused by contamination of prefilled heparin and isotonic sodium chloride solution syringes. Arch Intern Med 2009;169:17051711.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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Pseudo-outbreak of Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium sp. Associated with Contamination of Heparin-Saline Solution Syringes Used During Bone Marrow Aspiration
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