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Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage at Hospital Admission

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015


Irma Casas
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Nieves Sopena
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Maria Esteve
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Maria Dolores Quesada
Affiliation:
Microbiology Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Isabel Andrés
Affiliation:
Infection Control Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Lourdes Matas
Affiliation:
Microbiology Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Silvia Blanco
Affiliation:
Microbiology Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Maria Luisa Pedro-Botet
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Montse Caraballo
Affiliation:
Infection Control Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Vicente Ausina
Affiliation:
Microbiology Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Miquel Sabrià
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain
Corresponding

Abstract

To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage at the time of admission to our hospital, we screened the medical records of 1,128 patients for demographic and clinical data. The antimicrobial resistance pattern and genotype of MRSA isolates were studied. The prevalence of MRSA carriage at hospital admission was 1.4%. Older patients and patients previously admitted to healthcare centers were the most likely to have MRSA carriage at admission.


Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2011

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