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A national survey of testing and management of asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2019

Preeta K. Kutty*
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Susan E. Beekmann
Affiliation:
Infectious Disease Society of America Emerging Infections Network, Arlington, Virginia University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa
Ronda L. Sinkowitz-Cochran
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Erik R. Dubberke
Affiliation:
Washington University, St Louis, Missouri
David T. Kuhar
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
L. Clifford McDonald
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Philip M. Polgreen
Affiliation:
Infectious Disease Society of America Emerging Infections Network, Arlington, Virginia University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa
*
Author for correspondence: Preeta K. Kutty MD, MPH, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS A31 Atlanta, GA 30329-4027. Email: pkutty@cdc.gov

Abstract

A nationwide survey indicated that screening for asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile is an uncommon practice in US healthcare settings. Better understanding of the role of asymptomatic carriage in C. difficile transmission, and of the measures available to reduce that risk, are needed to inform best practices regarding the management of carriers.

Type
Concise Communication
Creative Commons
This work is classified, for copyright purposes, as a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection within the United States.
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: The information was presented in part at the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Spring 2018 Conference on Thursday, April 19, 2018, in Portland, Oregon.

References

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