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Investigation and Control of an Outbreak of Enterobacter aerogenes Bloodstream Infection in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Fiji

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Swastika A. Narayan
Affiliation:
Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Ministry of Health, Suva, Fiji
Jacob L. Kool
Affiliation:
Office for the South Pacific, World Health Organization, Suva, Fiji
Miriama Vakololoma
Affiliation:
Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Ministry of Health, Suva, Fiji
Andrew C. Steer
Affiliation:
Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Amelita Mejia
Affiliation:
Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Ministry of Health, Suva, Fiji
Anne Drake
Affiliation:
Fiji School of Medicine, Suva, Fiji
Adam Jenney
Affiliation:
Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Ministry of Health, Suva, Fiji Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Jane F. Turton
Affiliation:
Laboratory of HealthCare Associated Infection, Centre for Infections, Health Protection Agency, London, United Kingdom
Joseph Kado
Affiliation:
Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Ministry of Health, Suva, Fiji
Lisi Tikoduadua
Affiliation:
Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Ministry of Health, Suva, Fiji
Corresponding

Abstract

Ten neonates developed blood stream infection with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacter aerogenes in a neonatal intensive care unit in Fiji. The source of the outbreak was traced to a bag of contaminated normal saline in the ward, which was used for multiple patients. All isolates recovered from patients were indistinguishable from the bacteria recovered from the normal saline by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The outbreak was controlled using simple infection control practices such as reinforcement of strict hand hygiene policy, provision of single use vials of normal saline, and strict aseptic technique for injections.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2009

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References

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