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Infection Prevention and Control Guidance for Ronald McDonald Houses: A Needs Assessment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Judith A. Guzman-Cottrill
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
Kristina A. Bryant
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky
Danielle M. Zerr
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Alan A. Harris
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
Erin Rose Alexander
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
Zak Boone
Affiliation:
Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Oregon, Bend, Oregon
Jane D. Siegel
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We surveyed Ronald McDonald Houses (RMHs) to assess infection prevention and control (IPC) practices. A diverse patient population is served by RMH. Most sites have locally written IPC guidelines, and consultation resources vary, increasing the potential for inconsistent IPC practices. RMH would benefit from a standardized IPC guideline.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2012;33(3):299-301

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2012

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References

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