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Increasing burden of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecium in hospital-acquired bloodstream infections (2000–2014): A national dynamic cohort study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 April 2019


Koen Blot
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
Naïma Hammami
Affiliation:
Healthcare-Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance, Public Health and Surveillance Department, Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels, Belgium
Stijn Blot
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium Burns, Trauma and Critical Care Research Centre, University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Dirk Vogelaers
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium General Internal Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium
Marie-Laurence Lambert
Affiliation:
Healthcare-Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance, Public Health and Surveillance Department, Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels, Belgium
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The epidemiology of hospital-acquired bloodstream infections (HABSIs) based on the Belgian national surveillance program was analyzed (2000–2014). Our mixed-effects regression analysis identified increased rates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecium. HABSI incidence and resistance patterns should be further monitored because of their impact on proper empiric antibiotic therapy.


Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Increasing burden of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecium in hospital-acquired bloodstream infections (2000–2014): A national dynamic cohort study
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