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Incidence and Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Saudi Arabian Hospital, 1999-2003

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2016

Jaffar A. Al-Tawfiq*
Affiliation:
Internal Medicine Services Division, Dhahran Health Center, Saudi Aramco Medical Services Organization, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia
*
PO Box 76, Room A-420B, Building 61, Dhahran Health Center, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran 31311, Saudi Arabia, (jaffar.tawfiq@aramco.com)

Abstract

During 1999-2003 in a Saudi Arabian Hospital, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus constituted 6% of all S. aureus isolates; the proportion had increased from 2% in 1999, to 9.7% in 2002, to 8% in 2003. Of all MRSA isolates, 62% represented community-acquired infection, 20.4% represented healthcare-associated infection, and 17.6% represented nosocomial infection. The proportion of community-acquired isolates increased from 41.7% in 1999 to 66.6% in 2002, and the proportion representing nosocomial infection decreased from 33% in 1999 to 19% in 2003. Isolates representing nosocomial infection showed higher rates of resistance to ciprofloxacin (76.6%), clindamycin (76.6%), erythromycin (68%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (68%) than did isolates in the other categories (P<.001).

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2006

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