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Inappropriate Testing for Urinary Tract Infection in Hospitalized Patients: An Opportunity for Improvement

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Sarah Hartley
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Staci Valley
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Latoya Kuhn
Affiliation:
Patient Safety Enhancement Program and Hospital Outcomes Program of Excellence of the Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Laraine L. Washer
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan Department of Infection Control and Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tejal Gandhi
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Jennifer Meddings
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Carol Chenoweth
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Anurag N. Malani
Affiliation:
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sanjay Saint
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan Patient Safety Enhancement Program and Hospital Outcomes Program of Excellence of the Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Arjun Srinivasan
Affiliation:
Healthcare Associated Infection Prevention Programs, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Scott A. Flanders
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Urine cultures are frequently obtained for hospitalized patients. We reviewed documented indications for culture and compared these with professional society guidelines. Lack of documentation and important clinical scenarios (before orthopedic procedures and when the patient has altered mental status without a urinary catheter) are highlighted as areas of use outside of current guidelines.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2013

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