Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-2bgxn Total loading time: 0.257 Render date: 2022-11-30T11:59:30.867Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response on hospital infection prevention programs and practices in the southeastern United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2021

Sonali D. Advani*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Andrea Cromer
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Brittain Wood
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Esther Baker
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Kathryn L. Crawford
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Linda Crane
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Linda Roach
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Polly Padgette
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Elizabeth Dodds-Ashley
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
Ibukunoluwa C. Kalu
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
David J. Weber
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Emily Sickbert-Bennett
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Deverick J. Anderson
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina
*
Author for correspondence: Sonali Advani, E-mail: sonali.advani@duke.edu

Abstract

Initial assessments of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) preparedness revealed resource shortages and variations in infection prevention policies across US hospitals. Our follow-up survey revealed improvement in resource availability, increase in testing capacity, and uniformity in infection prevention policies. Most importantly, the survey highlighted an increase in staffing shortages and use of travel nursing.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: These data were presented as poster 1067286, “The Impact of COVID-19 Response on Infection Prevention Programs and Practices in Southeastern United States,” at IDWeek 2021 on September 29–October 30, which was held virtually.

References

Advani, SD, Baker, E, Cromer, A, et al. Assessing severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) preparedness in US community hospitals: a forgotten entity. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2021;42:600603.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kanwar, A, Heppler, S, Kanwar, K, Brown, CK. A survey of COVID-19 preparedness among hospitals in Idaho. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2020;41:10031010.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Calderwood, MS, Deloney, VM, Anderson, D, et al. Policies and practices of SHEA research network hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2020;41:11271135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duke. Duke Infection Control Outreach Network website. https://dicon.medicine.duke.edu/about. Published 2020. Accessed 2020, April 1.Google Scholar
Interim infection prevention and control recommendations for healthcare personnel during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/infection-control-recommendations.html. Published 2021. Accessed May 1, 2021.Google Scholar
Appropriate PPE during COVID-19 response. Duke Infection Control Outreach Network (DICON) website. https://dicon.medicine.duke.edu/sites/dicon.medicine.duke.edu/files/mkt-2083_covid_ppe_accommodations-draft_11_approved.pdf. Published 2021. Accessed May 1, 2021.Google Scholar
Berardi, A, Perinelli, DR, Merchant, HA, et al. Hand sanitisers amid COVID-19: a critical review of alcohol-based products on the market and formulation approaches to respond to increasing demand. Int J Pharm 2020;584:119431.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Advani, SD, Smith, BA, Lewis, SS, Anderson, DJ, Sexton, DJ. Universal masking in hospitals in the COVID-19 era: is it time to consider shielding? Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2020;41:10661067.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fakih, MG, Bufalino, A, Sturm, L, et al. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI): the urgent need to refocus on hardwiring prevention efforts. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2021. doi: 10.1017/ice.2021.70.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Supplementary material: PDF

Advani et al. supplementary material

Advani et al. supplementary material

Download Advani et al. supplementary material(PDF)
PDF 118 KB
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response on hospital infection prevention programs and practices in the southeastern United States
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response on hospital infection prevention programs and practices in the southeastern United States
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response on hospital infection prevention programs and practices in the southeastern United States
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *