Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Identification and Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Results of a National Survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015


Aaron M. Milstone
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Xiaoyan Song
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC
Susan Coffin
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Alexis Elward
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Washington Universityin St. Louis, Missouri
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

We surveyed members of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America to assess current practice with regard to identifying and eradicating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Although most respondents (86%) screened patients for MRSA colonization, variation existed in the number of anatomic sites sampled and in the use of culture at NICU admission, empirical institution of isolation precautions, and MRSA decolonization therapy. Evidence-based prevention strategies for MRSA transmission and infection are needed.


Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1.Lessa, FC, Edwards, JR, Fridkin, SK, Tenover, FC, Horan, TC, Gorwitz, RJ. Trends in incidence of late-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in neonatal intensive care units: data from the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system, 1995-2004. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2009;28(7): 577581.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2.Gorwitz, RJ, Kruszon-Moran, D, McAllister, SK, et al. Changes in the prevalence of nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in the United States, 2001-2004. J Infect Dis 2008;197(9): 12261234.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3.Klevens, RM, Edwards, JR, Tenover, FC, McDonald, LC, Horan, T, Gaynes, R. Changes in the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in intensive care units in US hospitals, 1992-2003. Clin Infect Dis 2006;42(3): 389391.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4.Huang, YC, Chou, YH, Su, LH, Lien, RI, Lin, TY. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and its association with infection among infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units. Pediatrics 2006;118(2): 469474.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5.Gerber, SI, Jones, RC, Scott, MV, et al. Management of outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the neonatal intensive care unit: a consensus statement. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2006;27(2): 139145.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6.Pinter, DM, Mandel, J, Hulten, KG, Minkoff, H, Tosi, MF. Maternal-infant perinatal transmission of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Am J Perinatol 2009;26(2): 145151.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7.Rohr, U, Mueller, C, Wilhelm, M, Muhr, G, Gatermann, S. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus whole-body decolonization among hospitalized patients with variable site colonization by using mupirocin in combination with octenidine dihydrochloride. J Hosp Infect 2003;54(4): 305309.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Sandri, AM, Dalarosa, MG, Ruschel de Alcantara, L, da Silva Elias, L, Zavascki, AP. Reduction in incidence of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in an intensive care unit: roļe of treatment with mupirocin ointment and Chlorhexidine baths for-nasal carriers of MRSA. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2006;27(2): 185187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Milstone, AM, Budd, A, Shepard, JW, et al. Role of decolonization in a comprehensive strategy to reduce'methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in the neonatal intensive care unit: an observational cohort study. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010;31(5): 558560.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10.Ridenour, G, Lampen, R, Federspiel, J, Kritchevsky, S, Wong, E, Climo, M. Selective use of intranasal mupirocin and Chlorhexidine bathing and the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection among intensive care unit patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2007;28(10): 11551161.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 17 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 4th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-87k5x Total loading time: 0.293 Render date: 2020-12-04T05:41:17.367Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Fri Dec 04 2020 04:59:07 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Identification and Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Results of a National Survey
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Identification and Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Results of a National Survey
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Identification and Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Results of a National Survey
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *