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Harnessing Claims to Improve Detection of Surgical Site Infections following Hysterectomy and Colorectal Surgery

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Alyssa R. Letourneau*
Affiliation:
Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
Michael S. Calderwood
Affiliation:
Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
Susan S. Huang
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, California
Dale W. Bratzler
Affiliation:
Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Allen Ma
Affiliation:
Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Deborah S. Yokoe*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
*
Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 181 Longwood Avenue, MCP Building, 5th Floor, Boston, MA 02115 (dyokoe@partners.org)
Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 181 Longwood Avenue, MCP Building, 5th Floor, Boston, MA 02115 (dyokoe@partners.org)

Abstract

Surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance is performed using a variety of methods with unclear performance characteristics. We used claims data to identify records for review following hysterectomy and colorectal surgery. Claims-enhanced screening identified SSIs missed by routine surveillance and could be used for targeted chart review to improve SSI detection.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2013

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References

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