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Effectiveness of Surveillance of Central Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection in an ICU in Korea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Sunmi Yoo
Affiliation:
Departments of Family Medicine, Preventive Medicine, and Internal Medicine, Dankook University Medical College
Mina Ha
Affiliation:
Departments of Family Medicine, Preventive Medicine, and Internal Medicine, Dankook University Medical College
Daeok Choi
Affiliation:
Hospital Infection Control Team, Dankook University Hospital
Hyunjoo Pai
Affiliation:
Departments of Family Medicine, Preventive Medicine, and Internal Medicine, Dankook University Medical College

Abstract

Objective:

To determine whether surveillance and infection control interventions decrease the incidence of catheter-related (CR) bloodstream infections (BSIs) in Korea.

Setting:

A medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) of a university hospital in Korea.

Design:

The CR infection rate of the intervention period was compared to that of historical controls for a 4-month period.

Patients:

All patients with a central venous catheter in the intensive care unit (ICU) from October 1998 to January 1999.

Methods:

Active infection control programs were initiated during the intervention period. Data collected included patient characteristics, risk factors of CR infection, and the microbiology laboratory results. Laboratory-proven CR infection rates were compared between the intervention group and control group.

Results:

304 catheters were inserted into 248 patients. The intervention group and the control group showed similar characteristics, but more patients in the intervention group received steroid therapy, and subclavian insertion was more common in the intervention group. CR BSI occurred in 1.3 per 1,000 catheter-days in the intervention group and 4.2 in the control group (binomial test, P=.14). CR infections were associated with the duration of ICU admission by multivariate logistic regression.

Conclusions:

The data suggested that an active infection surveillance and control program could reduce the rate of CR BSI in an ICU.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2001

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