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Documentation of acute change in mental status in nursing homes highlights opportunity to augment infection surveillance criteria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2020

Austin R. Penna*
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Christina L. Sancken
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Nimalie D. Stone
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Taniece R. Eure
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Wendy Bamberg
Affiliation:
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, Colorado
Grant Barney
Affiliation:
New York Emerging Infections Program, Rochester, New York
Devra Barter
Affiliation:
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, Colorado
Stacy Carswell
Affiliation:
Georgia Emerging Infections Program, Atlanta, Georgia
Paula Clogher
Affiliation:
Connecticut Emerging Infections Program and the Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut
Ghinwa Dumyati
Affiliation:
New York Emerging Infections Program, Rochester, New York University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York
Christina B. Felsen
Affiliation:
New York Emerging Infections Program, Rochester, New York University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York
Linda Frank
Affiliation:
California Emerging Infections Program, Oakland, California
Deborah Godine
Affiliation:
California Emerging Infections Program, Oakland, California
Helen Johnston
Affiliation:
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, Colorado
Marion A. Kainer
Affiliation:
Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville, Tennessee
Linda Li
Affiliation:
Maryland Department of Health, Baltimore, Maryland
Ruth Lynfield
Affiliation:
Minnesota Department of Health, St Paul, Minnesota
J. P. Mahoehney
Affiliation:
Minnesota Department of Health, St Paul, Minnesota
Joelle Nadle
Affiliation:
California Emerging Infections Program, Oakland, California
Rebecca Pierce
Affiliation:
Oregon Health Authority, Portland, Oregon
Susan M. Ray
Affiliation:
Georgia Emerging Infections Program, Atlanta, Georgia Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
Sarah Shrum Davis
Affiliation:
New Mexico Department of Health, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Marla Sievers
Affiliation:
New Mexico Department of Health, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Lucy E. Wilson
Affiliation:
Maryland Department of Health, Baltimore, Maryland
Alexia Y. Zhang
Affiliation:
Oregon Health Authority, Portland, Oregon
Shelley S. Magill
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Nicola D. Thompson
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
*
Author for correspondence: Austin R. Penna, E-mail: apenna@cdc.gov

Abstract

Acute change in mental status (ACMS), defined by the Confusion Assessment Method, is used to identify infections in nursing home residents. A medical record review revealed that none of 15,276 residents had an ACMS documented. Using the revised McGeer criteria with a possible ACMS definition, we identified 296 residents and 21 additional infections. The use of a possible ACMS definition should be considered for retrospective nursing home infection surveillance.

Type
Concise Communication
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This work is classified, for copyright purposes, as a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection within the United States.
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: Selected data included in this manuscript were presented in an abstract at the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Spring Conference, April 26, 2019, in Boston, Massachusetts.

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