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Days of Therapy and Antimicrobial Days: Similarities and Differences Between Consumption Metrics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 May 2016

Nathaniel J. Rhodes
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University, Chicago College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove, Illinois
Jamie L. Wagner
Affiliation:
University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Jackson, Mississippi
Elise M. Gilbert
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Chicago State University, College of Pharmacy, Chicago, Illinois
Page E. Crew
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University, Chicago College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove, Illinois
Susan L. Davis
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Wayne State University, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, Michigan.
Marc H. Scheetz
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University, Chicago College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove, Illinois
Corresponding

Abstract

Benchmarks for antimicrobial consumption measured in antimicrobial days are beginning to emerge. The relationship between the traditional measure of days of therapy and antimicrobial days is unclear. We observed a high intermethod correlation (R2=0.99): antimicrobial days were 1.9-fold lower than days of therapy across agents. Individual institutions should correlate these measures.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:971–973

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2016 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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References

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