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The Current State of Validating the Accuracy of Clinical Data Reporting: Lessons to Be Learned from Quality and Process Improvement Scientists

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Joseph A. Fortuna*
Affiliation:
American Society for Quality (ASQ) Healthcare Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
William A. Brenneman
Affiliation:
Quantitative Sciences, Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio
Sandra Storli
Affiliation:
Abbott Point of Care and ASQ Audit Division, Princeton, New Jersey
David Birnbaum
Affiliation:
Division of Disease Control and Health Statistics, Washington State Department of Health, Olympia, Washington
Kay L. Brown
Affiliation:
Heartland Kidney Network and Kansas City ASQ Section, Kansas City, Missouri
*
2040 Peniston Street, New Orleans, LA 70115 (josephf41@aol.com).

Abstract

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Type
Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2013

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References

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