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Clostridioides difficile infection and antibiotic prescription rates in the community: Explaining the gender gap

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 November 2020

Mariam Younas*
Affiliation:
University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina Department of Medicine, Prisma Health-Midlands, Columbia, South Carolina Department of Medicine, Hurley Medical Center, Flint, Michigan
Julie Royer
Affiliation:
South Carolina Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Office, Health and Demographics Division, Columbia, South Carolina
Sharon B. Weissman
Affiliation:
University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina Department of Medicine, Prisma Health-Midlands, Columbia, South Carolina
Hana R. Winders
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina Department of Pharmacy, Prisma Health Richland Hospital, Columbia, South Carolina
Sangita Dash
Affiliation:
University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina Department of Medicine, Prisma Health-Midlands, Columbia, South Carolina
P. Brandon Bookstaver
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina Department of Pharmacy, Prisma Health Richland Hospital, Columbia, South Carolina
Julie Ann Justo
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina Department of Pharmacy, Prisma Health Richland Hospital, Columbia, South Carolina
Katie S. Waites
Affiliation:
South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, South Carolina
Linda Bell
Affiliation:
South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, South Carolina
Majdi N. Al-Hasan*
Affiliation:
University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina Department of Medicine, Prisma Health-Midlands, Columbia, South Carolina
*
Author for correspondence: Mariam Younas, E-mail: drmariamyounas@gmail.com. Or Majdi N. Al-Hasan, E-mail: majdi.alhasan@uscmed.sc.edu
Author for correspondence: Mariam Younas, E-mail: drmariamyounas@gmail.com. Or Majdi N. Al-Hasan, E-mail: majdi.alhasan@uscmed.sc.edu

Abstract

In this cross-sectional population-based study, women had significantly higher crude incidence rates of both community-associated Clostridioides difficile infection (CA-CDI) and ambulatory antibiotic prescriptions compared to men in South Carolina in 2015. After adjustments for antibiotic prescription rates, there was no difference in the incidence rates of CA-CDI between the genders.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION. The preliminary results of this study were presented in part (abstract 975) at IDWeek, October 3–7, 2018, in San Francisco, California.

References

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