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Changes in the number of intensive care unit beds in US hospitals during the early months of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2021

Lindsey M. Weiner-Lastinger*
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Margaret A. Dudeck
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Katherine Allen-Bridson
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Raymund Dantes
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia Lantana Consulting Group, Thetford, Vermont
Cindy Gross
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia CACI, Atlanta, Georgia
Allan Nkwata
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia Leidos, Atlanta, Georgia
Sheri Chernetsky Tejedor
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia Lantana Consulting Group, Thetford, Vermont
Daniel Pollock
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Andrea Benin
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
*
Author for correspondence: Lindsey M. Weiner-Lastinger, E-mail: Llastinger@cdc.gov

Abstract

Using data from the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), we assessed changes to intensive care unit (ICU) bed capacity during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Changes in capacity varied by hospital type and size. ICU beds increased by 36%, highlighting the pressure placed on hospitals during the pandemic.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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References

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