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Can alternative anatomical sites and environmental surveillance replace perianal screening for multidrug-resistant organisms in nursing homes?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 May 2021

Kyle J. Gontjes*
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Kristen E. Gibson
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Bonnie Lansing
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Marco Cassone
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Lona Mody
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan Geriatrics Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
*
Author for correspondence: Kyle Gontjes, E-mail: kgontjes@umich.edu

Abstract

Perianal screening can be intrusive. The sensitivities of multianatomical, nonperianal surveillance were 92.3% for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 58.7% for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and 54.9% for resistant Gram-negative bacilli (R-GNB). Sensitivities improved upon adding environmental surveillance (95.5%, 82.9%, and 67.9%, respectively). Multianatomical, nonperianal screening and room environment surveillance may replace perianal screening and reduce healthy participant bias in nursing homes.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: Preliminary findings from this manuscript were accepted for SHEA Decennial 2020 and presented at IDWeek 2020, October 22–26, 2020, conducted virtually.

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