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Assessment of race and sex as risk factors for colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms in six nursing homes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2020

Kyle J. Gontjes
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Kristen E. Gibson
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Bonnie J. Lansing
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Lona Mody
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan Geriatrics Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans’ Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Marco Cassone*
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
*
Author for correspondence: Marco Cassone, E-mail: mcas@med.umich.edu

Abstract

The role of demographic characteristics, such as sex and race, as risk factors for colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms, has not been established in the nursing home setting. We demonstrate significantly higher prevalence overall in male patients, and sex differences are dependent on organism of interest and body site.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

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