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Police Shootings and Race in the United States: Why the Perpetrator Predation Perspective Is Essential to I-O Psychology's Role in Ending This Crisis

  • Mindy E. Bergman (a1)

Extract

As I write this essay in mid-September 2017, the news is reporting yet another tragic police shooting that led to the death of a US resident. This time, it was a deaf, nonverbal, Hispanic man in Oklahoma City, Magdiel Sanchez, who happened to be carrying a pipe that he used to fend off stray dogs when he went for walks at night (NewsOK, 2017). To the members of Mr. Sanchez's family and community, his name is the most important part of the previous sentence, but the most terrifying part for the rest of us is the first two words: this time.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Mindy E. Bergman, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Texas A&M University, 4235 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4235. E-mail: mindybergman@tamu.edu

References

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Police Shootings and Race in the United States: Why the Perpetrator Predation Perspective Is Essential to I-O Psychology's Role in Ending This Crisis

  • Mindy E. Bergman (a1)

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