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Issues of Gender Inequity Go Beyond STEM

  • P. D. Harms (a1) and Karen Landay (a1)

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Although Miner et al. (2018) effectively argue that there is a need for greater efforts on the part of I-O psychologists to confront gender inequity in the STEM fields, we feel that the preoccupation with STEM may blind us to other domains where similar issues not only exist but may be even more prevalent and problematic. Specifically, we would argue that more attention needs to be paid to skilled trades, transportation-related jobs, and other so-called “dirty work.”

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to P. D. Harms, University of Alabama, 101 Alston Hall, Box 870225, 361 Stadium Drive, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487. E-mail: pdharms@cba.ua.edu

References

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Bergman, M., & Jean, V. (2016). Where have all the “workers” gone? A critical analysis of the underprepresentativeness of our samples relative to the labor market in the industrial-organizational psychology literature. Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 9, 84113.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2015). STEM crisis or STEM surplus? Yes and yes. Monthly Labor Review. Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2015/article/stem-crisis-or-stem-surplus-yes-and-yes.htm.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2016). Women's earnings 83 percent of men's, but vary by occupation. TED: The Economics Daily. Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2016/womens-earnings-83-percent-of-mens-but-vary-by-occupation.htm
Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2017). Employed persons by detailed occupation, sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity. Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey. Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat11.htm
Engineering.com. (2015). Mike Rowe asks who took skilled trades out of STEM education. Retrieved from https://www.engineering.com/Blogs/tabid/3207/ArticleID/9752.
ManpowerGroup. (2016). The 10 hardest jobs to fill. Retrieved from http://www.manpowergroup.us/campaigns/talent-shortage/.
MinerK, N. K, N., Walker, J. M., Bergman, M. E., Jean, V. A., Carter-Sowell, A., January, S. C., & Kaunas, C. (2017). From “her” problem to “our” problem: Using an Individual lens versus a social structural lens to understand gender inequity in STEM. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 11 (2), 267–290.
Scandura, T., & Williams, E. (2000). Research methodology in management: Current practices, trends, and implications for future research. Academy of Management Journal, 43, 12481264.

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