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Integrating Trustworthiness for a More Nuanced Understanding of Nepotism and Cronyism

  • David K. Palmer (a1) and Michelle M. Fleig-Palmer (a1)

Extract

Jones and Stout (2015) have recommended that industrial and organizational (I-O) researchers and practitioners take a more nuanced perspective with respect to nepotism and cronyism—recast as social connection preference (SCP)—when relevant I-O decisions (e.g., hiring) are made on the basis of kin or affiliation considerations. Jones and Stout's (2015) arguments have challenged the reflexive view that SCP is always negative and thus the prudent approach is to restrict and, if possible, prohibit it. They call for further research to flesh out our understanding of SCP in organizations, and we suggest that one way to do that is to explicitly incorporate trust theory, that is, the components of trustworthiness, which represent antecedents of trust.

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Corresponding author

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to David K. Palmer, Department of Management, West Center 255W, College of Business & Technology, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kearney, NE 68849, or to Michelle M. Fleig-Palmer, Department of Management, West Center 409C, College of Business & Technology, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kearney, NE 68849. E-mail: palmerd@unk.edu or fleigpalmerm@unk.edu

References

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Integrating Trustworthiness for a More Nuanced Understanding of Nepotism and Cronyism

  • David K. Palmer (a1) and Michelle M. Fleig-Palmer (a1)

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