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Where Has All the Psychology Gone? (Twenty Years Later)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 November 2017

Michael J. Zickar*
Affiliation:
Bowling Green State University
Scott Highhouse
Affiliation:
Bowling Green State University
*
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Michael J. Zickar, Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403. E-mail: mzickar@bgsu.edu

Extract

Aguinis et al. (2017) contribute interesting analyses of cited sources in contemporary undergraduate industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology textbooks and continue their ongoing investigation into the long-term viability of I-O psychology as a unique discipline (see Aguinis, Bradley, & Brodersen, 2014). These analyses, conducted by authors who are members of business schools, attempt to answer questions related to the nature of work conducted by I-O psychologists, comparing the quality and importance of work conducted by faculty in business schools with that conducted by faculty in psychology departments. One of their general themes is that members of business schools are conducting important research that is influencing the future of I-O psychology by overtaking undergraduate textbooks. As such, the article has the feel of a conquering hero taunting its vanquished foe.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2017 

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References

Aguinis, H., Bradley, K. J., & Brodersen, A. (2014). Industrial–organizational psychologists in business schools: Brain drain or eye opener? Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 7, 284303. doi:10.1111/iops.12151 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aguinis, H., Ramani, R. S., Campbell, P. K., Bernal-Turnes, P., Drewry, J. M., Edgerton, B. T. (2017). Most frequently refd sources, articles, and authors in industrial-organizational psychology textbooks: Implications for the science-practice divide, scholarly impact, and the future of the field. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 10 (4), 507557.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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