Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-8lphq Total loading time: 0.237 Render date: 2022-07-01T17:48:09.775Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Tests Don't Measure Jobs: The Meaning of Content Validation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2015

Scott Highhouse*
Affiliation:
Bowling Green State University
*
E-mail: shighho@bgsu.edu, Address: Bowling Green State University, Department of Psychology, Bowling Green, OH 43403

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2009 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

APA. (1952). Technical recommendations for psychological tests and diagnostic techniques: A preliminary proposal. American Psychologist, 7, 461465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
American Psychological Association, American Educational Research Association, & National Council on Measurement in Education. (1974). Standards for educational and psychological testing. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
American Psychological Association, American Educational Research Association, & National Council on Measurement in Education. (1985). Standards for educational and psychological testing. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Arthur, W., Day, E. A., & Woehr, D. J. (2008). Mend it, don't end it: An alternate view of assessment center construct-related validity evidence. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 1, 105111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arthur, W., & Villado, A. J. (2008). The importance of distinguishing between constructs and methods when comparing predictors in personnel selection research and practice. Journal of Applied Psychology, 93, 435442.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Binning, J. F., & Barrett, G. V. (1989). Validity of personnel decisions: A conceptual analysis of the inferential and evidential bases. Journal of Applied Psychology, 74, 478494.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Borsboom, D., Mellenbergh, G. J., & Van Heerden, J. (2004). The concept of validity. Psychological Review, 111, 1061–1071.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brooks, M. E., & Highhouse, S. (2006). Can good judgment be measured? In Weekley, J. A. & Ployhart, R. E. (Eds.), Situational judgment tests (pp. 39–56). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Guion, R. M. (1987). Changing views for personnel selection. Personnel Psychology, 40, 199213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guion, R. M., & Highhouse, S. (2006). Essentials of personnel assessment and selection. Lawrence Erlbaum .Google Scholar
Haynes, S. N., Richard, D. C., & Kubany, E. S. (1995). Content validity in psychological assessment: A functional approach to concepts and methods. Psychological Assessment, 7, 238247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Landy, F. J. (1986). Stamp collecting versus science: Validation as hypothesis testing. American Psychologist, 41, 11831192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lissitz, R. W., & Samuelsen, K. (2007). A suggested change in terminology and emphasis regarding validity and education. Educational Researcher, 36, 437448.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Loevinger, J. (1957). Objective tests as instruments of psychological theory. Psychological Reports, 3, 635694.Google Scholar
Messick, S. (1989). Validity. In Linn, R. (ed.), Educational measurement (3rd ed., pp. 13103). Washington, DC: American Council on Education.Google Scholar
Mosier, C. I. (1947). A critical examination of the concepts of face validity. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 7, 191205.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murphy, K. R. (2009). Content validation is useful for many things, but validity isn't one of them. Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 2, 453464.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schiesheim, C. A., Cogliser, C. C., Scandura, T. A., Lankau, M. J., & Powers, K. J. (1999). An empirical comparison of approaches for quantitatively assessing the content adequacy of paper-and-pencil measurement instruments. Organizational Research Methods, 2, 140156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sireci, S. G. (1998). The construct of content validity. Social Indicators Research, 45, 83117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tenopyr, M. L. (1977). Content-construct confusion. Personnel Psychology, 30, 4754.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Tests Don't Measure Jobs: The Meaning of Content Validation
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Tests Don't Measure Jobs: The Meaning of Content Validation
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Tests Don't Measure Jobs: The Meaning of Content Validation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *