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Taking Workplace Decisions Seriously: This Conversation Has Been Fruitful!

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2015


Silvia Bonaccio
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa
Reeshad S. Dalal
Affiliation:
George Mason University
Scott Highhouse
Affiliation:
Bowling Green State University
Daniel R. Ilgen
Affiliation:
Michigan State University
Susan Mohammed
Affiliation:
The Pennsylvania State University
Jerel E. Slaughter
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
Corresponding

Abstract

We are gratified by the large number of commentaries to our focal article (Dalal, Bonaccio, et al., 2010) that advocated greater integration of industrial–organizational psychology and organizational behavior (IOOB) with the field of judgment and decision making (JDM). The commentaries were uniformly constructive and civil. Our disagreements with the commentaries are mild and are limited primarily to the roles of external validity, internal validity, and laboratory experiments in IOOB. For the majority of our response, we attempt to build on the views expressed in the commentaries and to articulate some thoughts regarding the future. We structure our response according to the following themes: barriers to cross-fertilization between IOOB and JDM, areas of existing and potential JDM-to-IOOB cross-fertilization, areas of potential IOOB-to-JDM cross-fertilization, and ways to increase (and ideally institutionalize) cross-fertilization. We hope our focal article and our response to the commentaries will help to ignite exciting basic research and important practical applications associated with decision making in the workplace.


Type
Response
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2010

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