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Stereotype Threat: How Does It Measure Up?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2015

Luiz F. Xavier*
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida
Barbara A. Fritzsche
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida
Elizabeth J. Sanz
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida
Nicholas A. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida
*
E-mail: luizfranciscoxavier@gmail.com, Address: Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816

Abstract

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Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2014

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References

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