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Six Questions That Practitioners (Might) Have About Ideal Point Response Process Items

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2015

Dev K. Dalal*
Affiliation:
Bowling Green State University
Scott Withrow
Affiliation:
Bowling Green State University
Robert E. Gibby
Affiliation:
Procter & Gamble
Michael J. Zickar
Affiliation:
Bowling Green State University
*
E-mail: ddalal@bgsu.edu, Address: Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403.

Abstract

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Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2010 

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Footnotes

*

Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University

References

Allen, M. J., & Yen, W. M. (1979). Introduction to measurement theory. Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press. Google Scholar
Carter, N. T., & Dalal, D. K. (2010). An ideal point account of the JDI Work satisfaction scale. Personality and Individual Differences, 49, 743748.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chernyshenko, O. S., Stark, S., Drasgow, F., & Roberts, B. W. (2007). Constructing personality scales under the assumptions of an ideal point response process: Toward increasing the flexibility of personality measures. Psychological Assessment, 19, 88106. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Drasgow, F., Chernyshenko, O. S., & Stark, S. (2010). 75 years after Likert: Thurstone was right! Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 3, 465476.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hinkin, T. R. (1998). A brief tutorial on the development of measures for us in survey questionnaires. Organizational Research Methods, 1, 104121. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kline, R. B. (2005). Principle and practice of structural equation modeling (2nd ed.). New York: The Guilford Press. Google Scholar
Likert, R. (1932). The method of constructing an attitude scale. Archives of Psychology, 140, 4453. Google Scholar
Roberts, J. S., Donoghue, J. R., & Laughlin, J. E. (2000). A generalized item response theory model for unfolding unidimensional polytomous responses. Applied Psychological Measurement, 24, 332. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, J. S., & Laughlin, J. E. (1996). A unidimensional item response model for unfolding responses from a graded disagree–agree response scale. Applied Psychological Measurement, 20, 231255. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thurstone, L. L. (1928). Attitudes can be measured. American Journal of Sociology, 33, 529554. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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