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Sampling in Industrial–Organizational Psychology Research: Now What?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2015

Gwenith G. Fisher*
Affiliation:
Colorado State University
Kyle Sandell
Affiliation:
Colorado State University
*
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Gwenith G. Fisher, Department of Psychology, 1876 Campus Delivery, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523–1876. E-mail: gwen.fisher@colostate.edu

Extract

We agree with the authors of the focal article that too little attention is paid to sampling in industrial–organizational (I-O) psychology research. Upon reflection and in response to the focal article by Landers and Behrend (2015), we answer three primary questions: (a) What is it about our training, science, and practice as I-O psychologists that has led to less focus on sampling issues? (b) Does it matter? (c) If so, then what should we do about it?

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2015 

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References

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