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Partnering Against Poverty: Fighting POSH Bias Through Increased Interdisciplinary Research and Practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2017

Shujaat Ahmed
Affiliation:
Lewis College of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology
Ashley J. Hoffman
Affiliation:
National Passenger Railroad Corporation (Amtrak)
Morrie Mullins
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Xavier University
Laura Sywulak
Affiliation:
Global Organisation for Humanitarian Work Psychology, City University of New York
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

Industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology is indeed moving forward in its involvement in humanitarian concerns (Berry et al., 2011), but as Gloss, Carr, Reichman, Abdul-Nasiru, and Oestereich (2017) point out, I-O psychologists tend to focus less on those of low income and the informal economy and more on working professionals in the formal economy (POSH). We propose (a) additional reasons for why the POSH bias may undermine science, (b) more solutions to benefit the impoverished, and (c) a broader conceptualization of humanitarian work psychology (HWP).

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2017 

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References

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