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The other published literature: Attrition modeling in the U.S. military as a bridge between turnover science and practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 November 2019

Dan J. Putka*
Affiliation:
Human Resources Research Organization
Rodney A. McCloy
Affiliation:
Human Resources Research Organization
Chad H. Van Iddekinge
Affiliation:
Florida State University
Huy Le
Affiliation:
University of Texas at San Antonio
*
*Corresponding author. Email: dputka@humrro.org

Abstract

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Type
Commentaries
Copyright
© Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2019 

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References

Campbell, J. P., & Wilmot, M. P. (2018). The functioning of theory in industrial, work, an organizational psychology (IWOP). In Anderson, N., Ones, D. S., Sinangil, H. K., & Viswesvaran, C., (Eds.), The Sage handbook of industrial, work, and organizational (IWOP) psychology: Volume 1 personnel psychology (2nd ed.) (pp. 337). London, UK: Sage.Google Scholar
Hambrick, D. C. (2007). The field of management’s devotion to theory: Too much of a good thing? Academy of Management Journal, 50, 13461352.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marshall-Mies, J. C., Jupton, T. B., Hirose, C., White, M. A., Mottern, J. A., & Eshwar, N. C. (2007). First Watch on the first term of enlistment: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of data from the first year of the study (NPRST-TR-07-3). Millington, TN: Navy Personnel Research, Studies, and Technology Division. Retrieved from https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a463174.pdfGoogle Scholar
McCloy, R. A., & DiFazio, A. S. (1996). Prediction of first-term military attrition using preenlistment predictors. In Campbell, J. P. & Zook, L. M. (Eds.), Building and retaining the career force: New procedures for accessing and assigning Army enlisted personnel (ARI Research Note 96-45, pp. 169214). Alexandria, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Retrieved from https://archive.org/details/DTIC_ADA309090Google Scholar
Putka, D. J., & Strickland, W. J. (2005). A comparison of the FY03 and FY99 first term attrition study cohorts (Study Report 2005-05). Arlington, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Available online at: https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a440522.pdfCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singer, J. D., & Willett, J. B. (2003). Applied longitudinal data analysis. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, A. B., Dutta, S., Chen, M., & Trussell, G. (2019). Here to stay or go? Connecting turnover research to applied attrition modeling. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 12(3), 272–296.Google Scholar
Strickland, W. J. (Ed.). (2005). A longitudinal examination of first term attrition and reenlistment among FY1999 enlisted accessions (Technical Report 1172). Arlington, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Retrieved from https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a440522.pdfGoogle Scholar
White, M. A., Harris, R. N., Mottern, J. A., & Eshwar, N. C. (2008). First watch on the first term of enlistment: A summary and update of results from Version 1 of the First Watch Instruments (NPRST-TR-09-2). Millington, TN: Navy Personnel Research, Studies, and Technology Division. Retrieved from https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a489579.pdfGoogle Scholar
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