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Links Among Bases of Validation Evidence: Absence of Empirical Evidence Is not Evidence of Absence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2015

Dan J. Putka
Affiliation:
Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO)
Rodney A. McCloy
Affiliation:
Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO)
Michael Ingerick
Affiliation:
Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO)
Patrick Gavan O’Shea
Affiliation:
Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO)
Deborah L. Whetzel
Affiliation:
Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO)
Corresponding
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Abstract

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Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2009

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References

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