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The Limited Utility of Stereotype Threat Research in Organizational Settings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2015

Valerie N. Streets*
Affiliation:
Old Dominion University
Debra A. Major
Affiliation:
Old Dominion University
*Corresponding
E-mail: vstreets@odu.edu, Address: Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529

Abstract

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Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2014

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References

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Ployhart, R. E., Ziegert, J. C., & McFarland, L. A. (2003). Understanding racial differences on cognitive ability tests in selection contexts: An integration of stereotype threat and applicant reactions research. Human Performance, 16, 231259.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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