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The “How” Matters as Much as the “Who”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2017

Ashley J. Hoffman
Affiliation:
Human Resources Department, National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Corresponding
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Extract

It appears that although Gloss, Carr, Reichman, Abdul-Nasiru, and Oestereich (2017) have considered many of the arenas where industrial and organizational (I-O) psychology intersects with impoverished or atypical populations, an oft-overlooked domain is that of I-O psychologists working in military settings. Arguably the largest humanitarian aid and development organization in the world, national militaries offer a rich opportunity for I-O psychologists to study not only the more “POSH” aspects of work, but also the difficulties surrounding employees who must address impoverished citizens, lack of resources, bureaucracy far removed from the front lines, discrimination, threats to safety, and all kinds of cross-cultural interactions. As such, this humanistic, humanitarian movement could do well from studying the ways military units have successfully and not-so-successfully approached a timely and difficult subject.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2017 

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References

Fine, S., Goldenberg, J., & Noam, Y. (2016). Integrity testing and the prediction of counterproductive behaviours in the military. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 89 (1), 198218. doi: 10.1111/joop.12117 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gloss, A., Carr, S. C., Reichman, W., Abdul-Nasiru, I., & Oesterich, W. T. (2017). From handmaidens to POSH humanitarians: The case for making human capabilities the business of I-O psychology. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 10 (3), 329–369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rothstein, M., McLarnon, M., & King, G. (2016). The role of self-regulation in workplace resiliency. Industrial and Organizational Psychology-Perspectives on Science and Practice, 9 (2), 416421. doi: 10.1017/iop.2016.32 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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