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Employee Work Ethic in Nine Nonindustrialized Contexts: Some Surprising Non-POSH Findings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2017

Alex de Voogt
Affiliation:
Drew University
Jonas W. B. Lang
Affiliation:
Department of Personnel Management, Work and Organizational Psychology, Ghent University
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

Gross, Carr, Reichman, Abdul-Nasiru, and Oestereich's (2017) article argues that industrial and organizational (I-O) psychology has a limited perspective that rarely goes beyond the specific professional populations in formal economies of high-income countries—a perspective they refer to as a POSH perspective. This valuable criticism should also eschew the notion that workers in nonindustrialized countries are necessarily different.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2017 

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Footnotes

The authors wish to thank Richard Butler and Elizabeth DeGaetano for their immediate support, as well as the many international participants whose enthusiasm has made this research possible.

References

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