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Don't Throw the Baby Out With the Bathwater: Comparing Data Quality of Crowdsourcing, Online Panels, and Student Samples

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2015

Nicolas Roulin*
Affiliation:
University of Manitoba
*
Correspondence concerning this article should be sent to Nicolas Roulin, Asper School of Business, Department of Business Administration, University of Manitoba, 406 Drake Center, Winnipeg, Manitoba, CanadaR3T 5V4. E-mail: nicolas.roulin@umanitoba.ca

Extract

In their focal article, Landers and Behrend (2015) propose to reevaluate the legitimacy of using the so-called convenience samples (e.g., crowdsourcing, online panels, and student samples) as compared with traditional organizational samples in industrial–organizational (I-O) psychology research. They suggest that such sampling strategies should not be judged as inappropriate per se but that decisions to accept or reject such samples must be empirically or theoretically justified. I concur with Landers and Behrend's call for a more nuanced view on convenience samples. More precisely, I suggest that we should not “throw the baby out with the bathwater” but rather carefully and empirically examine the advantages and risks associated with using each sampling strategy before classifying it as suitable or not.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2015 

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References

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