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Author instructions

Founded in 1958, the Historical Journal publishes on all aspects of history since 1500, providing a forum for younger scholars making a distinguished debut as well as publishing the work of historians with an international reputation. The journal publishes original research in full-length articles and shorter communications as well as major surveys of the field in historiographical reviews and review articles. Contributions are aimed both at specialists and non-specialists.

Authors wishing to contribute a manuscript to the Historical Journal should consult the following::

Historical Journal instructions for contributors Download Instruction for Contributors in PDF. (20 KB).

Authors preparing accepted manuscripts for publication should consult the following:

Historical Journal instructions for authors of accepted papers Download Instruction for Contributors in PDF. (20 KB).

To view the PDF files linked above, you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR CONTRIBUTORS

1. Submissions must:

  1. a. be the original work of the author;
  2. b. not be under consideration for publication elsewhere;
  3. c. not have been published before, even in part, in print or electronically.

2. Submissions should be made online at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/hj

You will need to create an account if you do not have one. (If you are unsure if you have an account, or have forgotten your password, use the password help function.) Please contact the part-time office at hj@hist.cam.ac.uk if you have any questions about the procedure, or wish to make a submission by another means.

3. Aside from the main text, you will need to provide with your submission:

  1. a. an abstract of not more than 200 words;
  2. b. a single title which clarifies the subject matter of your paper, and which is no more than 20 words long. Colons and sub-titles are only allowed at the discretion of the co-editors;
  3. c. a running head of not more than 35 characters;
  4. d. a word count, including notes.

4. Texts must be completely anonymous to allow double-blind refereeing; referees consider PDF versions of texts. Acknowledgements and the like can be added later to submissions which are accepted for publication.

5. Initial submissions should be presented to a high scholarly standard. You must double space the text, paginate, and use arabic (not roman) numerals to indicate footnotes, which should be single spaced at the bottom of the page. Divide submissions into sections, marked by roman numerals not sub-titles. Introductory sections can be left unnumbered. On acceptance, authors will be asked to bring their piece into line with the journal's conventions, details of which are below.

6. Please try to keep the length of articles to 10,000 words, communications to 5,000 words, historiographical reviews to 8,000 words, and review articles to a maximum of 5,000 words with 700-1,000 words given to each book reviewed - all inclusive of footnotes. We sometimes publish significantly longer contributions, but authors must raise this possibility with the editors at the earliest stage, ideally before submission, via hj@hist.cam.ac.uk .

7. We will consider submissions in languages other than English. In the first instance, send a 300 word summary in English of your proposal to hj@hist.cam.ac.uk . When a non-English submission is accepted, a small fund exists to support the author in providing a high-quality English translation. Authors submitting in English for whom English is not their first language may wish to have their manuscript read by a native speaker before submission.

We encourage the use of illustrations, graphs, and tables where they present essential material or aid understanding. Authors are responsible for obtaining necessary permissions for illustrations. At submission stage, simple scanned images of illustrations are acceptable, but high quality images are required for accepted submissions - details are below. Figures may, if appropriate, appear in colour in the digital version of the published article but will be printed in black and white.

While much of the content we publish rests on original research and specialist knowledge, contributions should be accessible and stimulating to the non-specialist. It is vital that you provide sufficient historiographical context and make clear the wider significance of your submission.

OPEN ACCESS POLICY

The Historical Journal has established an open access policy that allows all authors to achieve full compliance with all existing open access (OA) requirements including those of RCUK and HEFCE in the UK, the Wellcome Trust, the EU's Horizon 2020 funding programme and the Australian Research Council. To this end, authors whose articles are accepted for publication are able to post their accepted manuscript on their personal/departmental websites and their institution's digital repository as soon as they receive a positive decision from the Editors. For these purposes the 'accepted manuscript' is defined as the fully peer-reviewed version of a paper at the point at which it has been accepted for publication by the Editors but before it is sent to the publisher for copyediting and typesetting. Immediate posting of this version is also permitted in non-commercial subject repositories. A link to the final publisher-produced, paginated 'version of record', on the publisher's platform, must be included once the article has been through the publication process. This 'version of record' (the published PDF) should not be deposited or made available beyond the publisher 's platform without separate permission from the publisher.

The HEFCE policy, which was announced in March 2014, relates to articles accepted for publication after April pt 2016. To be eligible for inclusion in the next REF assessment, papers must be deposited in the author's institutional repository no more than three months after they have been accepted for publication. It is the author's responsibility to ensure that this action is undertaken.

If the author or author's funding body requires an article to be freely available online to non-subscribers immediately upon publication or published under a Creative Commons licence (gold open access), they may request this subject to payment of an article processing charge (APC). In these circumstances, the manuscript submission and peer review procedures are unchanged. On acceptance of the article, the author will be asked to let Cambridge University Press know directly if they are choosing this option. More information about the APC price and licensing choices can be found on the Cambridge Core Website www.cambridge.org/core/services/open-access-polici... ).

Last revised: January 2017





DETAILED NOTES FOR ACCEPTED CONTRIBUTIONS

When a submission has been accepted, authors must prepare their work for copyediting by following closely the journal’s stylistic conventions. Please also check footnotes carefully at this stage. Do not otherwise alter the text without consulting with your editor.

General

Typescripts must be double spaced, paginated, not right-justified (i.e. with a ragged right margin), preferably on A4 paper, with margins of at least one inch. Paragraph breaks should be indicated by indents and not line breaks. The first paragraph of an article, and of numbered sub-sections, should not be indented.

Notes must be double spaced, and placed at the end of the article, not at the bottom of the page; but they will be printed in the journal at the bottom of the page and are thus referred to as footnotes below.

If you are including tables, graphs, or illustrations: a) fine copy must be provided; b) number in sequence throughout the article; c) references to sources and descriptive headings must be attached; d) indicate clearly where the material is to appear in the text; e) ensure that there is a reference to it in the text.

Illustrations must be supplied as high resolution electronic files preferably saved as TIFF or EPS files, not as Postscript files. Line drawings should be scanned at 300 dpi and use only conventional Postscript fills. Halftones should be scanned at 600dpi with the preset dot range from 1-96%. If you wish to compress the files use lossless compression package software such as the LZW compression package.

Copyright and permissions

Contributors of submissions published in the journal sign a license to publish with Cambridge University Press. In doing so, contributors retain the right to republish their contribution in a work of their own or a work they are editing without seeking formal permission, provided full acknowledgement is given to the original source. At proof stage contributors will be asked to complete the license to publish. This helps ensure maximum protection against unauthorized use, and helps ensure that requests to reproduce contributions are handled effectively.

Contributors are responsible for obtaining permission to reproduce any material, including illustrations, in which they do not hold the copyright and for ensuring that the appropriate acknowledgements are included in the typescript. In quoting from copyright material, contributors should keep in mind that the rule of thumb for ‘fair use’ confines direct quotation to a maximum of 200 words. In obtaining permissions, authors must seek permission to reproduce material not within the author’s copyright for dissemination worldwide in all forms and media, including electronic publication. The relevant permissions should be attached to the author’s copyright forms on their return. It should be possible in most cases to obtain permissions for use of copyright material in the context of an academic journal article, but authors in need of advice are encouraged to consult the editors.

Layout according to these different templates

(it is useful to have a recent example to hand when doing this)

I Articles:

a. The title, in capitals and centred.

b. Author’s name, in capitals and centred.

c. Author’s academic institution, in italics and centred.

d. Running-head, of not more than 35 letters and spaces.

e. Abstract of up to 200 words, in a single paragraph.

f. Sub-sections, marked by roman numerals, centred, but without sub-titles.

g. Contact details (postal and email addresses) should be placed before the first numbered footnote.

h. If desired, acknowledgements may be made in an opening note, marked by an asterisk placed at the end of the title, and appearing in the notes between the contact details and the first numbered footnote.


II Communications (note no running head):

a. The title, in capitals and centred.

b. Author’s name, in capitals and centred.

c. Author’s academic institution, in italics and centred).

d. Abstract of up to 200 words, in a single paragraph.

e. Sub-sections, marked by roman numerals, centred, but without sub-titles.

f. Contact details (postal and email addresses) should be placed before the first numbered footnote.

g. If desired, acknowledgements may be made in an opening note, marked by an asterisk placed at the end of the title, and appearing in the notes between the contact details and the first numbered footnote.


III Historiographical reviews (note no running head and that books and articles discussed are footnoted in the ordinary way):

a. The title, in capitals and centred.

b. Author’s name, in capitals and centred.

c. Author’s academic institution, in italics and centred).

d. Abstract of up to 200 words, in a single paragraph.

e. Sub-sections, marked by roman numerals, centred, but without sub-titles.

f. Contact details (postal and email addresses) should be placed before the first numbered footnote.

g. If desired, acknowledgements may be made in an opening note, marked by an asterisk placed at the end of the title, and appearing in the notes between the contact details and the first numbered footnote.


IV Review articles (note no abstract, contact details, running head)

a. The title, in capitals and centred.

b. List the books reviewed under the title, including ALL the following information for each: title; author; place of publication; publisher; date published; number of pages; ISBN; price. Thus: The right to be king: the succession to the crown of England, 1603-1714. By Howard Nenner. London: Macmillan, 1995. Pp. xiv + 343. ISBN 0333577248. £45.00.

c. If desired, sub-sections, marked by roman numerals, centred, but without sub-titles.

d. If desired, footnotes may be used in the usual way. In writing reviews, it is acceptable to give page citations in brackets within the text (instead of footnotes) where there is extensive discussion of a particular book.

e. In capitals on a single line, on the left your academic affiliation and on the right your name.

f. If desired, acknowledgements may be made in an opening note, marked by an asterisk placed at the end of the title, and appearing in the notes between the contact details and the first numbered footnote.


V Single reviews

a. List the book, including ALL the following information for each: title; author; place of publication; publisher; date published; number of pages; ISBN; price. Thus: The right to be king: the succession to the crown of England, 1603-1714. By Howard Nenner. London: Macmillan, 1995. Pp. xiv + 343. ISBN 0333577248. £45.00.

b. The text of the review, without footnotes. In writing reviews, it is acceptable to give page citations in brackets within the text (instead of footnotes) where there is extensive discussion of a particular book.

c. In capitals on a single line, on the left your academic affiliation and on the right your name.


Text conventions

Copy-editing can be a lengthy and complex business, so please observe the Journal’s stylistic conventions closely. Note that the Journal uses British not American conventions and spelling.


Quotations

Follow the punctuation, capitalization, and spelling of the original. Use single quotation marks (except that quotations within quotations take double quotation marks). Long quotations of fifty words or more should be typed as a displayed extract, i.e. a separate block with a line space above and below, double spaced, without quotation marks.

Use three point ellipses ... when omitting material within quotations. Do not put brackets around ellipses; and rarely is there any purpose in placing ellipses at the beginning or end of quotations. Punctuation should come after closing quotation marks, except for exclamation marks and question marks belonging to the quotation, or a full stop if the quotation is (or ends with) a grammatically complete sentence beginning with a capital. Some examples:

He declared that ‘the sergemakers are rebelling’.

He made his report. ‘The sergemakers are rebelling.’

He stated that ‘Mr Ovington told me, "the sergemakers will rebel", but I did not believe him’.

Use square brackets for editorial interpolations within quoted matter.

Spelling

Follow British English rather than American English (e.g. defence, labour, programme, sceptical). Note the following preferences:

  • -ize
  • -tion
  • acknowledgement
  • appendixes
  • connection
  • dispatch
  • elite (no accent)
  • focused
  • inquiry
  • judgement
  • medieval
  • premise
  • reflection
  • regime (no accent)
  • role (no accent)

Note especially the use of -ize not –ise, as in criticize, emphasize, organize.


Titles cited in the text

Titles of books should be italicized; do not use inverted commas. Use inverted commas and roman type if naming a part of a book or an individual chapter. E.g. ‘This point is strongly made in the fourth chapter, ‘Of sincerity’, in Maxim Pirandello’s Princely government (1582).’

Foreign words and phrases

Foreign words and phrases should be italicized, except when they are naturalized, i.e. have become normalized in English usage. E.g. phronesis, ius naturale, status quo, ex officio. Some words that are naturalized may nonetheless still carry accents, if it affects pronunciation, e.g. protégé, whereas ‘regime’ and ‘role’ have lost their accents. Short foreign phrases that are italicized should not also carry inverted commas. Longer foreign passages should be treated as quotations, i.e. should be in roman with quotation marks. Avoid using too much untranslated foreign material: many readers will not have a reading knowledge of foreign languages.

Numerals

Spell out all numbers up to ninety-nine, except when used in groups or in statistical discussion, e.g. ‘75 voted for, 39 against, and 30 abstained’. Precise measurements should be in figures (£3.54, 7 stone, 23.4 mm). Percentages should be in figures, with the words ‘per cent’ spelt out (25 per cent). Thousands take a comma: ‘5,000'. Note the use of elisions: 156-9 (except that teens are not fully elided: 115-16).

Punctuation

Use the serial comma: ‘red, white, and blue’ not ‘red, white and blue’. The addition of a possessive ’s following a name ending in -s is preferred (e.g. Dickens’s not Dickens’), except that people in the ancient world do not carry the possessive final ‘s, e.g. Sophocles’, Jesus’. Note that plainly parenthetical clauses or phrases require commas both before and after them; authors in doubt about comma placement in these and other cases are advised to consult Fowler’s English Modern Usage. Round (not square) brackets should be used for brackets within brackets. Square brackets should be reserved for editorial interpolation within quoted matter. Spaced en-rules ( – ) should be used for parenthetical dashes.

Dates

12 December 1970 (no comma) in the text (not December 12th, 1970). Elisions: 1834-5,1816-17, except that in article headings and in citing titles of books and articles use 1834-1835, i.e. without elision. Place a comma before dates when citing titles of books and articles: A history of Hungary, 1810-1890. Decades: 1850s not 1850's. ‘Sixteenth century’ (noun, without hyphen); ‘sixteenth-century’ (adjective, with hyphen). ‘From 1785 to 1789', not ‘from 1785-9'; likewise ‘between 1785 and 1789', not ‘between 1785-9'.

In footnotes use the standard abbreviations for months: Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., May, June, July, Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec.

Abbreviations

MS MSS v (verson) r (recto) f ff (= the following page(s)) fo. fos. (= folio(s)) ed. eds. vol. vols. 2nd edn Mr Dr St (i.e. without points where the abbreviation ends with the last letter of the word). BBC BL ODNB EU MP NATO UK USA TNA etc. (i.e. without points). Provide an explanation for any unusual abbreviations at the first mention, e.g. ‘CPGB (Communist Party of Great Britain)’; ‘Somerset Record Office (SRO)’. Initials in personal names retain points, and should be spaced: ‘A. G. Smith’.

Capitalization

The Journal uses lower case wherever possible. We do not insist on total consistency across all articles. It might be appropriate, for example, in one article to use Whig and Tory, but in another to use whig and tory. The cardinal rule is to be self-consistent within each article.


Use lower case for titles of books and articles (except for the initial letter), but not for journals and newspapers, where each significant word carries a capital. E.g. ‘In his book The making of peace he argued in favour; but, writing in The Sheffield Gazette, he declared that ...’ Note that newspapers include the definite article in their titles when cited in the text, e.g. The Guardian, The Observer, The Lancet; but without the definite article in footnotes, e.g. Guardian, 14 Aug. 1964, p. 8.

Use lower case for titular offices: the king, sultan, monarch, pope, lord mayor, prime minister, foreign secretary, bishop of Durham, chiefs of staff, duke of Portland. But upper case to avoid ambiguity (the Speaker, the British Resident).

Use upper case in personal titles only when they immediately preface names (Pope John, King William, Duke Richard, Viscount Andover, Bishop Outhwaite). E.g. ‘The earl of Lovelace conveyed the king’s command to the bishops ordering them to refrain from preaching, but Bishop Outhwaite was not dissuaded.’

In general, use lower case for institutions, government agencies, etc.: the cabinet, privy council, royal commission, select committee, member of parliament (but MP), the opposition. But upper case to avoid ambiguity or where convention insists: the Bank of England, King’s Bench, the Inner Temple, the House of Commons.

Political parties carry lower case unless there is ambiguity or other good reason: whig, tory, the Conservative government, the Liberal party.

Use lower case for historical systems, periods, events, and religions, wherever possible: Washington treaty, the British empire, home rule, the commonwealth, puritans. But use upper case to avoid ambiguity or where convention insists: the Congress of Vienna, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the First World War, the French Revolution, the Third Republic, the Second Empire, the Union; Catholic, Protestant, Muslim, Jewish, Wesleyan, Quaker.

Note that words derived from names of persons take upper case: Jesuit, Calvinism, Bonapartist, Marxism.

Use lower case for official publications (e.g. the report of the select committee on agriculture, a bill, an act, the act, the bill), except for the names of specific items (e.g. the Stamp Act).

Examples:
  • an act
  • Anglican, Baptists
  • battle of Waterloo
  • bishop of Durham, Bishop Tenison
  • British empire
  • cabinet
  • chiefs of staff
  • the church
  • the Commons
  • commonwealth
  • Congregational
  • continent
  • council of state
  • crown
  • deist
  • dissenter
  • duke of Portland, Duke William
  • evangelical
  • First World War
  • prime minister
  • privy council
  • Prussian Diet
  • puritan
  • Seven Years’ War
  • the state
  • foreign secretary
  • great council
  • high church
  • houses of parliament
  • king
  • King’s Bench
  • Kirk
  • Labour opposition
  • lord mayor
  • member of parliament
  • Methodists
  • middle ages
  • ministry of defence
  • nonconformists
  • nonjuror
  • papacy, papists
  • parliament, parliamentarians
  • popery, popish
  • Presbyterian
  • tory
  • Trinitarian
  • the Union
  • Unitarian
  • Washington treaty
  • whig


Hyphens

Hyphenate compound adjectives and adverbs that precede a noun (eighteenth-century architecture, slow-sailing vessel, well-made books) except for compounds with adverbs ending in –ly (expertly written books).

Footnotes

Notes are referred to here as footnotes and will be printed as such, but should be presented as double-spaced endnotes in the final version of the typescript. In the text, footnote indicators should come after and not before punctuation and be in the form of superscript numerals, without brackets. Keep notes brief. They are primarily for the citation of sources and should only very rarely be used to provide additional commentary or information.

An initial footnote, indicating acknowledgements, when keyed to the article’s title, should carry an asterisk and not the numeral ‘1'.

The Journal’s method of citation is to give a full bibliographical reference at the first citation, and then author-plus-short-title in subsequent citations.

First references to manuscript sources, books, dissertations and articles are to be punctuated, spelt out or abbreviated, and capitalized as in the following examples:

Cardwell to Russell, 3 Nov. 1865, London, The National Archives (TNA), Russell papers, 30/22/156, fo. 23.

John Morley, The life of William Ewart Gladstone (2 vols., London, 1988), II, pp. 121-34.

M. Cowling, 1867: Disraeli, Gladstone and revolution: the passing of the second Reform Bill (Cambridge, 1967), pp. 41-5, 140-7.

David Harris Sacks, The widening gate: Bristol and the Atlantic economy, 1450-1700 (Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA, 1991), pp. 54ff.

Sverre Bagge, ‘The individual in medieval historiography’, in Janet Coleman, ed., The individual in political theory and practice (Oxford, 1996), p. 45.

C. M. Williams, ‘The political career of Henry Marten’ (D.Phil. thesis, Oxford, 1954), ch. 6, passim.

W. G. Hynes, ‘British mercantile attitudes towards imperial expansion’, Historical Journal, 19 (1976), pp. 969-76.

Edmund Ludlow, A voyce from the watch tower, ed. A. B. Worden (Camden Fourth Series, vol. 21, London, 1978).

Note the following points:

  • lower case in titles (except for journals and newspapers)
  • lower case for ‘bk’, ‘ch.’.
  • place of publication but not publisher; US place names to be followed by abbreviated state names, in the form CA, MA, NY, etc. authors’ forenames or initials as they appear in the original (though it is permissible to reduce all forenames to initials)
  • ‘p.’ or ‘pp.’ are always used before page references
  • a space follows ‘p.’ and ‘pp.’
  • volume but not issue number of journals given (except that for pre-twentieth century journals it is often necessary to provide issue numbers)
  • volume numbers of journals in arabic not roman numerals
  • volume numbers for multi-volume books in roman small capitals
  • subtitles separated by colons
  • dates in titles of books and articles separated by commas
  • elision of page numbers
  • ‘ed.’ and ‘eds.’ not ‘(ed.)’ and ‘(eds.)’
  • editors’ names come before and not after a book title, except where the book carries an author’s name, in the case of memoirs, autobiographies, etc.
  • ‘ch.’ not ‘chap.’
  • a space follows initials of names
  • supply full page ranges for articles in journals
  • anglicize foreign places of publication, e.g. Cologne rather than Kőln.

Note also:

Where a quotation or particular fact needs referencing, and the work in question is a journal article needing the full page range at a first citation, then use the following form: Phyllis Deutsch, ‘Moral trespass in Georgian London’, Historical Journal, 39 (1996), pp. 637-56, at p. 642.

Be especially careful in citing multi-volume works. Avoid ambiguity about whether the date given is the date of a particular volume or of the whole series. Use the form: E. S. de Beer, ed., The Correspondence of John Locke (8 vols., Oxford, 1976-89), V, p. 54. Multi-volume works occur in so many different guises – e.g. general editors and volume editors, series titles and individual volume titles – that it is not possible to prescribe a universal form of citation; the priorities should be swift direction of the reader to the correct volume and the avoidance of ambiguity.

Even where an historian’s name is given in the text, it should be repeated in the footnote citation. I.e. do not leave a footnote citation bereft of an author.

In a series of citations within a single footnote, items should generally be separated by a semi-colon rather than a point.

For early modern printed works place of publication may be omitted providing there is a covering note at the beginning, e.g., ‘All pre-1800 works were published in London unless otherwise stated.’ Use ‘n.d.’ (no date) and ‘n.p.’ (no place of publication) where the information is not known. Use signature numbers (‘sig.’) where pagination is absent.

Internet and microfilm citations

Where these accurately reproduce the original printed work (e.g. in a PDF) or manuscript source (e.g. in a microfilm), cite the original source, not the copy.

Cite other internet sources by using a stable URL in pointed brackets (< >), with the date at which the resource was created (not accessed) where appropriate.

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography should be cited in this form:

Julian Hoppit, 'King, Gregory (1648-1712)', ODNB.

Second and subsequent references

Use the author’s surname and short title: not author’s name alone

Use ‘Ibid.’ : see under Latinisms below

Use abbreviations (e.g. for archive repositories) only if the abbreviation has been explained in the initial reference

For example:

BN n.a.fr. 20628 (Thiers Papers), fo. 279

TNA, Russell papers, 30/22/156, fo. 41.

Morley, Gladstone, II, pp. 147ff.

Cowling, 1867, p. 91.

Ibid., p. 108.

Hynes, ‘Mercantile attitudes’, pp. 971-4; Sacks, Widening gate, p. 19.

Abbreviations in footnotes

Note the following common abbreviations used in citations of source materials in footnotes (see also under Latin abbreviations below):

  • ed. or eds. = editor(s)
  • edn = edition
  • ff = the following pages, e.g. pp. 54ff (but pp. 54-5 for one page following)
  • fo. or fos. = folio(s)
  • MS or MSS = manuscript(s)
  • p. or pp. = page(s)
  • qu. = quoted
  • r = recto (the front side of a foliated manuscript leaf)
  • sig. = signature number, where there is no pagination in an early modern book
  • trans. = translation, or translator
  • v = verso (the reverse side of a foliated manuscript leaf)
  • vol. or vols. = volume(s)

Latin abbreviations

Only three may be used (and none is italicized).

a. Ibid. This is used to denote a repetition of the immediately preceding item, where only a different page (or volume) number needs to be recorded. Do not use if the preceding footnote contains two or more references because of the ambiguity.

b. Idem. This is used to denote a repetition of the immediately preceding author’s name, where only a different book or article title (and page references) needs to be recorded.

c. Passim. This is used to denote that a topic is referred to periodically throughout the source cited.

Do not use ‘op. cit.’, ‘loc. cit.’, ‘infra’, or ‘cf.’

Copyediting and proofs

The Journal’s copyeditor usually contacts author direct by email with any queries. These must be dealt with within a week.

Proofs are sent electronically to authors, usually within two months of copyediting. Only essential typographical or factual errors may be changed at proof stage. The publisher reserves the right to charge authors for correction of non-typographical errors.

Offprints

Electronic offprints are supplied to authors as a PDF file of their article which they can print or copy electronically.

Last revised: 2 January 2020

ORCID

The Historical Journal now requires that all corresponding authors identify themselves using their ORCID iD when submitting a manuscript to the journal. ORCID provides a unique identifier for researchers and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript submission and grant applications, provides the following benefits:

  • Discoverability: ORCID increases the discoverability of your publications, by enabling smarter publisher systems and by helping readers to reliably find work that you’ve authored.
  • Convenience: As more organisations use ORCID, providing your iD or using it to register for services will automatically link activities to your ORCID record, and will enable you to share this information with other systems and platforms you use, saving you re-keying information multiple times.
  •  Keeping track: Your ORCID record is a neat place to store and (if you choose) share validated information about your research activities and affiliations.


If you don’t already have an iD, you’ll need to create one if you decide to submit a manuscript to The Historical Journal. You can register for one directly from your user account on Scholar One or via https://ORCID.org/register.

If you already have an iD, please use this when submitting, either by linking it to your Scholar One account or supplying it during submission by using the “Associate your existing ORCID ID” button.

Last updated June 12th, 2019

The Historical Journal
  • ISSN: 0018-246X (Print), 1469-5103 (Online)
  • Frequency: 5 issues per year
The Historical Journal continues to publish papers on all aspects of British, European, and world history since the fifteenth century. The best contemporary scholarship is represented. Contributions come from all parts of the world. The journal aims to publish some thirty-five articles and communications each year and to review recent historical literature, mainly in the form of historiographical reviews and review articles. The journal provides a forum for early career scholars making a distinguished debut as well as publishing the work of historians of established reputation.
Title history
Currently known as:
The Historical Journal
Vol 1 (1958) onwards
ISSN: 0018-246X (Print), 1469-5103 (Online)

Formerly known as:
Cambridge Historical Journal
Vol 1 (1923) - Vol 13 (1957)
ISSN: 1474-6913 (Print), 1474-6913 (Online)